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FLIGHT PROJECTS - VIDEO GALLERY
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Project Page Publications Image Gallery Videos

Onboard Vision-based Flight, 2017 - Robust visual-inertial odometry and relocalization enable aggressive trajectories to be flown using only onboard cameras and computation (no GPS or external motion capture system). The second trajectory in this video, after optimization, demonstrates agile flight at 6m/s with accelerations over 1.3g.
Onboard Vision-based Flight, 2017
BiBlade Touch-and-Go Demonstration on a Full-Scale/Mass Spacecraft Testbed, 2017 - Demonstration of the BiBlade sampler on-board a full-scale spacecraft emulator for touch-and-go sampling validation. The spacecraft emulator is 2200kg - representative of full spacecraft mass and inertia. Closed loop control of the spacecraft emulator provides testing at representative touchdown velocities. The material sampled into is MPACS comet simulant with a strength of 5MPa cone penetration resistance. (0:29)
BiBlade Touch-and-Go Demonstration on a Full-Scale/Mass Spacecraft Testbed, 2017
BiBlade Sample Acquisition and Survivability High-speed Video, 2016 - Highspeed video replayed approximately 1/170th speed showing sample acquisition of high-end expected strength comet simulant and validating robustness of impact into a high strength/rigidity surface via survivability of the sampler mechanism impacting a concrete cinder block. The overload/isolation springs can be seen compressing when the blades strike a rigid surface or when excess energy remains after an acquired sample. (2:12)
BiBlade Sample Acquisition and Survivability High-speed Video, 2016
USV Swarm II Demo, 2016 - This video shows describes new autonomy technology that enabled a team of unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) to execute cooperative behaviors in the ‘USV Swarm II’ harbor patrol demonstration, using JPL’s CARACaS autonomy architecture. In USV Swarm II, CARACaS demonstrated higher levels of autonomy and more complex cooperation than previous on-water exercises, using full-sized vehicles and real-world sensing and communication. Significantly, CARACaS not only executed tasks such as Patrol, Track, Inspect, and Trial safely and efficiently but also recognized what tasks needed to be accomplished based on a dynamic world model, eliminating the need for an operator in the loop.
USV Swarm II Demo, 2016
 
BiBlade End-to-End Sample Chain Demonstration, 2015 - Demonstration of the end-to-end BiBlade sampling chain including sample acquisition and sample stowage. The sampler is mounted to a 3 DoF planar robotic arm representative of the notional flight system. The BiBlade releases sample vault lids located on the face of the tool (inside the blades) via a Frangibolt bolt cutter. These lids passively affix to the vaults, thus encapsulating the sample in the mock-up Sample Return Capsule. (2:34)
BiBlade End-to-End Sample Chain Demonstration, 2015
Surrogate, Lidar-Based Pose Estimation, 2014 - A short video showing the Surrogate robot lidar-based pose estimation algorithm using a Velodyne laser range finder. The robot is moved along an approximate path 5-10m in length and the pose is shown in green. Keyframes are stored and used to associate each new laser scan frame in an iterative-closest-point methodology.
Surrogate, Lidar-Based Pose Estimation, 2014
Surrogate, Path Planning for Valve Turning, 2014 - A short video showing the Surrogate robot using its tracked wheels to mobilize towards a valve via a planned path. The user interfaces with the robot control center to fit the valve object and command a grasp and rotate behavior. The robot executes the behavior and successfully rotates the valve shut.
Surrogate, Path Planning for Valve Turning, 2014
Surrogate, Turning an Activation Switch, 2014 - A short video showing the Surrogate robot grasping a J-CAD chemical sensor and enabling the device by twisting the top cap to engage power. Human teleoperation is used at a high level to guide object detection and localization. The grasping behavior and subsequent twist action is completely autonomous. The robot localizes the cap location using a sequence of touch moves and applies whole body control to complete the action sequence.
Surrogate, Turning an Activation Switch, 2014
 
Surrogate, Instrument Panel Manipulation, 2014 - A short video showing the Surrogate robot being commanded to start a generator.  First, the environment is perceived using stereo and lidar and a map is created and segmented.  Then an operator selects the action and target on a tablet interface.  Based on this, the robot plans a path and provides a preview of the planned action for confirmation by the operator.  After approval and during execution of the motion, the robot uses visual tracking of fiducials to refine its motion.
Surrogate, Instrument Panel Manipulation, 2014
Surrogate, Whole-Body Valve Turn, 2014 - This video shows the actions of a whole body controller during closure of a valve by the Surrogate robot.
Surrogate, Whole-Body Valve Turn, 2014
SmalBoSSE Closed Loop Path Following in a 6-DOF Small Body Testbed, 2014 - Demonstration of gravity offloading and mobility control of the SmalBoSSE prototype vehicle.
SmalBoSSE Closed Loop Path Following in a 6-DOF Small Body Testbed, 2014
Robosimian, DARPA Robotics Challenge Highlights, 2013 - Video synopsis of Robosimian competing in the DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials in December 2013.
Robosimian, DARPA Robotics Challenge Highlights, 2013
 
Rock Climbing Robot and Zero-g Drill, 2013 - JPL Robotics has developed the worlds first rock climbing robot. This video presents climbing trials at vertical, overhanging, and inverted angles, and a zero-g drill for astronauts.
Rock Climbing Robot and Zero-g Drill, 2013
ARM-S Phase 2, Cutting a Wire, 2013 - This video shows an autonomous two-arm manipulator performing a sequence of sub-tasks to eventually cut a wire. The robot first identifies bag of tools and a burlap sack covering the scene. It then removes the burlap sack to unveil a junction box with a wire. The tool bag is opened and a pair of trimmers is removed from the bag, re-positioned in the hands, and finally used to cut the detected wire. The video is sped up by 2x.
ARM-S Phase 2, Cutting a Wire, 2013
ARM-S Phase 2, Changing a Tire, 2012 - This video shows an autonomous two-arm manipulator changing a wheel mounted on a fixed stand. The robot scans the scene to segment out objects, identifies the wheel and impact-driver, manipulates the impact-driver to remove all four lug nuts, and removes the wheel. A human user then places a new wheel in the scene and the robot completes the sequence by mounting the new wheel on the bolts. The video is sped up by 2x and is all one continuous shot from multiple camera angles.
ARM-S Phase 2, Changing a Tire, 2012
Durable Reconnaissance and Observation Platform (DROP), 2011 - The Durable Reconnaissance and Observation Platform (DROP) is a prototype robotic platform with the ability to climb concrete curbs and stairs. It can also climb surfaces up to 85 degrees at a rate of 25cm/s, makes rapid horizontal to vertical transitions, carry an audio/visual reconnaissance payload, and survive impacts from 3 meters. DROP is manufactured using a combination of selective laser sintering (SLS) and shape deposition manufacturing (SDM) techniques. The platform uses a two-wheel, two-motor design that delivers high mobility with low complexity.  (ICRA 2012 Best Video Award Finalist)
Durable Reconnaissance and Observation Platform (DROP), 2011
 
ARM-S Phase 1, Grasping in Cluttered Environments, 2011 - This video shows visual object recognition and manipulator path planning in a cluttered environment.  First the scene is imaged and the flashlight localized.  Then a path is planned to move to the grasp position, grasp, and carry the flashlight to the target orange square on the table top.  The planned path avoids collisions of the arm and flashlight with the rest of the environment, while optimizing path length and joint torques.
ARM-S Phase 1, Grasping in Cluttered Environments, 2011
Axel Field Tests, 2011 - Results from two field trials of the Axel and DuAxel rovers at a Mars analogue site near Black Lava Point, Arizona (done in conjunction with MSL)
and at a local quarry in Canyon Country, CA.   Tele-operated demonstrations include DuAxel traverses up slopes exceeding 35 degrees, separation
of Axel from DuAxel, and Axel excursions in extreme terrains with slopes ranging from 30 – 85 degrees and in terrains littered with boulders.
A sequence of microscopic, spectroscopic and thermal measurements are acquired on stratigraphic layers of such slopes.
Axel Field Tests, 2011
Microspine Grippers, 2011 - The video presents microspine-based anchors being developed for gripping rocks on the surfaces of comets and asteroids, or for use on cliff faces and lava tubes on Mars. Two types of anchor prototypes are shown on supporting forces in all directions away from the rock; greater than 160 N tangent, greater than 150 N at 45 degrees, and greater than 180 N normal to the surface of the rock. A compliant robotic ankle with two active degrees of freedom interfaces these anchors to the Lemur IIB robot for future climbing trials. Finally, a rotary percussive drill is shown coring into rock regardless of gravitational orientation. As a harderthan-zero-g proof of concept, inverted drilling was performed creating 20mm diameter boreholes 83 mm deep in vesicular basalt samples while retaining 12 mm diameter rock cores in 3-6 pieces. (ICRA 2012 Best Video Award Finalist)
Microspine Grippers, 2011
ARM-S Phase 1, Unlocking a Door, 2011 - This video shows autonomous insertion of a key and unlocking a door.  After imaging the scene and localizing the handle, the arm moves toward contact using the key already in the hand. The finger knuckles move into contact with the door handle on both the front and side face to provide relative hand to handle localization. The key is then inserted using force control and dither motions.
ARM-S Phase 1, Unlocking a Door, 2011
 
Tri-ATHLETE Driving, 2009 - Field tests showing Tri-ATHLETE driving capabilities. The first video shows six-wheeled driving on flat terrain.  The second video shows steep terrain driving.  The third shows clearing a boulder in rough terrain.
Tri-ATHLETE Driving, 2009
Tri-ATHLETE Habitat Transport, 2009 - Field test showing two Tri-ATHLETE rovers transporting a mock-up habitat.  The first video shows offloading from a mock-up lunar lander.  The second video shows undocking from the deployed habitat.
Tri-ATHLETE Habitat Transport, 2009
Tri-ATHLETE Skills, 2009 - Field demonstration of Tri-ATHLETE exercising useful skills.  The first video shows attaching a gripper and using it to grab and transport a utility box.  The second video shows smoothing terrain with a scoop.  The third video shows one three-legged unit standing tall.
Tri-ATHLETE Skills, 2009
Axel Rover Demo, 2009 - Engineers from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and students at the California Institute of Technology have designed and tested a versatile, low-mass robot that can rappel off cliffs, travel nimbly over steep and rocky terrain, and explore deep craters (1:17).
Axel Rover Demo, 2009
 
ATHLETE Skills, 2007 - These videos show the ATHLETE Rover's skills in 2007.  The first shows two ATHLETE's coordinating to move a large object. The second shows ATHLETE dropping from a height of 1m, where 5/6 of the vehicle's weight is compensated by the test fixture to simulate landing in the 1/6g lunar environment. The third is assembled from individual toolcam images taken as ATHLETE scooped surface material using a wheel-mounted shovel. The fourth shows ATHLETE turning in place on uneven ground with the legs actively controlled to keep the rover deck level as the wheel heights follow the terrain.
ATHLETE Skills, 2007
ATHLETE Skills, 2006 - These videos show the skills of the ATHLETE Rover in 2006.
ATHLETE Skills, 2006
ATHLETE Climbing, 2006 - These videos show the ATHLETE Rover's climbing skills in 2006.
ATHLETE Climbing, 2006
ATHLETE Driving, 2006 - These videos show the ATHLETE Rover's driving skills.
ATHLETE Driving, 2006
 
ATHLETE Skills, 2005 - These videos show the skills of the ATHLETE Rover in 2005.
ATHLETE Skills, 2005
PAARV, Planetary Autonomous Amphibious Robotic Vehicle, 2004 - PAARV is a concept vehicle for exploration of the liquid and solid surfaces of Saturns moon, Titan.
PAARV, Planetary Autonomous Amphibious Robotic Vehicle, 2004
Webcrawler V2 - 2003 - The second Micro-Robot Explorer was designed to crawl across a mesh using six legs with force-feedback grippers.
Webcrawler V2 - 2003
Brachiation Bot - 2003 - As part of the Micro-Robot Explorer task, a mesh-crawling robot was created using the minimum number of actuators to traverse the mesh - the BrachiationBot.
Brachiation Bot - 2003
 
Spiderbot Demo - 2002 - The Spiderbot design evolution is shown, resulting in a mobile hexapod with onboard processing, power, and communications. A year-end demonstration of the Spiderbot showed the robot repairing a broken communication relay line using its onboard radio.
Spiderbot Demo - 2002
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