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VIDEO GALLERY - SYSTEMS' VIDEOS
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Axel Field Tests, 2011 - Results from two field trials of the Axel and DuAxel rovers at a Mars analogue site near Black Lava Point, Arizona (done in conjunction with MSL)
and at a local quarry in Canyon Country, CA. Tele-operated demonstrations include DuAxel traverses up slopes exceeding 35 degrees, separation
of Axel from DuAxel, and Axel excursions in extreme terrains with slopes ranging from 30 – 85 degrees and in terrains littered with boulders.
A sequence of microscopic, spectroscopic and thermal measurements are acquired on stratigraphic layers of such slopes.
Axel Field Tests, 2011
Tri-ATHLETE Driving, 2009 - Field tests showing Tri-ATHLETE driving capabilities. The first video shows six-wheeled driving on flat terrain. The second video shows steep terrain driving. The third shows clearing a boulder in rough terrain.
Tri-ATHLETE Driving, 2009
Tri-ATHLETE Habitat Transport, 2009 - Field test showing two Tri-ATHLETE rovers transporting a mock-up habitat. The first video shows offloading from a mock-up lunar lander. The second video shows undocking from the deployed habitat.
Tri-ATHLETE Habitat Transport, 2009
Tri-ATHLETE Skills, 2009 - Field demonstration of Tri-ATHLETE exercising useful skills. The first video shows attaching a gripper and using it to grab and transport a utility box. The second video shows smoothing terrain with a scoop. The third video shows one three-legged unit standing tall.
Tri-ATHLETE Skills, 2009
 
Axel Rover Demo, 2009 - Engineers from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and students at the California Institute of Technology have designed and tested a versatile, low-mass robot that can rappel off cliffs, travel nimbly over steep and rocky terrain, and explore deep craters (1:17).
Axel Rover Demo, 2009
ATHLETE of the Future, 2007 - Brian Wilcox provides an overview of the All Terrain, Hex-Legged, Exterrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) lunar robot prototype. (3min)
(Original URL is <a href=http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/videos/technology/athlete-20070806/ target=_blank>here</a>.)
ATHLETE of the Future, 2007
ATHLETE Skills, 2007 - These videos show the ATHLETE Rover's skills in 2007. The first shows two ATHLETE's coordinating to move a large object. The second shows ATHLETE dropping from a height of 1m, where 5/6 of the vehicle's weight is compensated by the test fixture to simulate landing in the 1/6g lunar environment. The third is assembled from individual toolcam images taken as ATHLETE scooped surface material using a wheel-mounted shovel. The fourth shows ATHLETE turning in place on uneven ground with the legs actively controlled to keep the rover deck level as the wheel heights follow the terrain.
ATHLETE Skills, 2007
ATHLETE Skills, 2006 - These videos show the skills of the ATHLETE Rover in 2006.
ATHLETE Skills, 2006
 
ATHLETE Climbing, 2006 - These videos show the ATHLETE Rover's climbing skills in 2006.
ATHLETE Climbing, 2006
ATHLETE Driving, 2006 - These videos show the ATHLETE Rover's driving skills.
ATHLETE Driving, 2006
ATHLETE Skills, 2005 - These videos show the skills of the ATHLETE Rover in 2005.
ATHLETE Skills, 2005
Lemur, Docking Demonstration, 2005 - Lemur IIa is shown docking with a support fixture using visual targets for self positioning. Additionally, a sticky gripper demonstration is shown. (3:34, no audio)
Lemur, Docking Demonstration, 2005
 
Lemur, In Space Assembly, 2005 - Lemur IIa is shown traversing through a mockup space structure truss to a task board, where it performs vision-guided body positioning and bolt tightening. (2:46, no audio)
Lemur, In Space Assembly, 2005
Lemur, Robot Traverse of Mirror Surface, 2005 - The Lemur IIa robot is shown walking across the surface of a segmented mirror, with footfalls at the segment nodes. (4 minutes, no audio)
Lemur, Robot Traverse of Mirror Surface, 2005
Lemur, Skills Demonstration, 2005 - Lemur IIa shows four skills: body motion, inverted body pose and motion, direction change, and floor to ceiling transition. (2:27, no audio)
Lemur, Skills Demonstration, 2005
Lemur, Three Tool Demonstration, 2005 - Lemur IIa uses three limbs to position tools during an assembly task: a spotlight, a rotary wrench, and a close focus camera. Additionally, Lemur is shown signing its name with pen and paper. (3:39, no audio)
Lemur, Three Tool Demonstration, 2005
 
EDL, Vision Guided Autonomous Safe Landing, 2004 - Demonstration of helicopter landing, autonomously and safely, in an obstacle field. (1:53, no narration)
EDL, Vision Guided Autonomous Safe Landing, 2004
FIDO, Technology and Training for Mars, 2002 - Description of FIDO rover field trials at Grey Mountain, Arizona, and associated MER operations readiness test at JPL. (6 min)
FIDO, Technology and Training for Mars, 2002
Urbie, Indoor Navigation, 2001 - Urbie uses ladar to nagigate through obstacles indoors.
Urbie, Indoor Navigation, 2001
FIDO, Toward Mobile Autonomy, 2001 - Descriptions of FIDO rover technology and third field test with MER scientists at Soda Mountain, California. (7 min)
FIDO, Toward Mobile Autonomy, 2001
 
Urbie, 2001 - The Tactical Mobile Robot program, in the DARPA Advanced Technology Office, has enlisted JPLs Machine Vision Group in leading the design and implementation of its perception urban robot. This urban robot (Urbie) is a joint effort of JPL, iRobot Corporation, the Robotics Institute of Carnegie Mellon University, and the University of Southern California Robotics Research Laboratory. <p>
Urbies initial purpose is mobile military reconnaissance in city terrain but many of its features will also make it useful to police, emergency, and rescue personnel. The robot is rugged and well-suited for hostile environments and its autonomy lends Urbie to many different applications. Such robots could investigate urban environments contaminated with radiation, biological warfare, or chemical spills. They could also be used for search and rescue in earthquake-struck buildings and other disaster zones. <p>
To be able to investigate dangerous areas, Urbie has been outfitted with many different sensors and cameras. These include among others, stereo cameras, an Omnicam, three-axis gyros and accelerometers, digital compass, and a high-precision gps. In the future Urbie will also carry a night-vision camera and a two-axis scanning laser rangefinder. <p>
(8:44, no audio)
Urbie, 2001
FIDO, In Situ Exploration, 2000 - Descriptions of FIDO rover technology and second field test at Black Rock Summit, Nevada. (6:17)
FIDO, In Situ Exploration, 2000
FIDO, Exploration Technology Rover, 1999 - Descriptions of FIDO rover development and first field tests at Silver Lake, California. (7:47)
FIDO, Exploration Technology Rover, 1999
Rocky 7, Autonomous Multiple Rock Sample Acquisition (1999) - Unedited segment of a typical experimental run. After receiving three target locations, the rover begins its autonomous operation with no further external communication. Using visual tracking, it successfully collects three rocks. (10 min)
Rocky 7, Autonomous Multiple Rock Sample Acquisition (1999)
 
Rocky 7, Long Range Science Rover Technology, 1998 - This video describes the research accomplishments of the Long Range Science Rover task in 1998 using the Rocky 7 rover. Demonstrations are shown for improved onboard path planning, terrain-based rover localization, simultaneous motion and hazard detection, autonomous bi-directional driving, smart execution with replanning, and ground-based automated path planning. (8 min)
Rocky 7, Long Range Science Rover Technology, 1998
RAMS, Robot Assisted Micro Surgery, 1997 - Description, demonstration, and medical test results for the RAMS system are provide. Features include force reflection and scaling, miniature forceps for suturing or particle capture, and dual arm coordination. (5 min)
RAMS, Robot Assisted Micro Surgery, 1997
Rocky 7, Mojave Desert Field Tests, 1997 - This video describes a simulated 32 day Mars mission conducted with scientists at Lavic Lake in May 1997. From emulated descent imagery obtained by helicopter, planetary geologist Ray Arvidson selected four locations to be visit: desert pavement, dry lakebed, cratered playa, and an alluvia fan. Rocky 7 drove greater than 1km and visited all sites, where imagery and science instrument readings were obtained. Details may be found in: R. Volpe, <a href=http://www-robotics.jpl.nasa.gov/publications/Richard_Volpe/Jr7SunNav.pdf target=_blank>Navigation Results from Desert Field Tests of the Rocky 7 Mars Rover Prototype</a>, International Journal of Robotics Research, Special Issue on Field and Service Robots, 18(7), July 1999. (7min)
Rocky 7, Mojave Desert Field Tests, 1997
Rocky 7, Long Range Science Rover, 1996 (long version) - <br>
Part 1: This video describes the research accomplishments of the Long Range Science Rover task in 1996 using the Rocky 7 rover. Demonstrations are shown for distributed collaborative sequence building using the Web Interface for TeleScience (WITS) and single uplink command cycle execution of: visual goal identification, spectrometer positioning and reading, verification of soil-like terrain before digging, soil digging with visual confirmation of sample acquisition, change-based position estimation from lander imagery, and long traverse navigation with sun sensor heading determination. Time lapse imagery of the entire demonstration is provided. (10 min)
<br>
Part 2: Intial development of the Rocky 7 mast is shown, including benchtop testing of its functionality for image panorama capture and instrument placement of a microscopic camera. (2 min)
Rocky 7, Long Range Science Rover, 1996 (long version)
 
Rocky 7, Long Range Science Rover, 1996 (short version) - This video describes the research accomplishments of the Long Range Science Rover task in 1996 using the Rocky 7 rover. Demonstrations are shown for distributed collaborative sequence building using the Web Interface for TeleScience (WITS) and single uplink command cycle execution of: visual goal identification, spectrometer positioning and reading, soil digging with visual confirmation of sample acquisition, change-based position estimation from lander imagery, and long traverse navigation with sun sensor heading determination. (4 min)
Rocky 7, Long Range Science Rover, 1996 (short version)
Rocky 7, Rover Technology Research, 1995 - This video describes the development of the Rocky 7 research rover. Featured
are demonstrations of a new manipulator design for spectrometer pointing and
terrain sampling, autonomous localization by a lander viewing a colored cylinder
on the rover, obstacle detection and goal confirmation using stereo vision, and
multiple science task execution per communication cycle. The manipulator
capabilites are shown in the captured images above. More details of this work
may be found in R. Volpe, J. Balaram, T. Ohm, and R. Ivlev, <a
href=http://www-robotics.jpl.nasa.gov/publications/Richard_Volpe/iros96.pdf
target=_blank>The Rocky 7 Mars Rover Prototype</a>, IEEE / RSJ International
Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Osaka, Japan, November 4-8,
1996. (7min)
Rocky 7, Rover Technology Research, 1995
RAMS, Robot Assisted Micro Surgery, 1994 - The RAMS manipulation system is shown performing high precision force and position control. (5 min)
RAMS, Robot Assisted Micro Surgery, 1994


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