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Aaron Parness' Picture
Address:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
M/S 82-105
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena, CA 91109
Phone:
818.393.2236
Fax:
818.393.3254
Email:
Click here
Member of:
347C
Extreme Environment Robotics Group

Dr. Aaron Parness
Group Leader
(Full description>>)

Biography (more>>)
Dr. Parness received two Bachelor of Science degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Masters of Science and Doctor of Philosophy from Stanford University. Currently, he performs research on the attachment interfaces between robotic systems and their surrounding environment, working primarily on climbing robots and robotic grippers. An expert in novel methods of prototype manufacturing, Dr. Parness has experience in microfabrication, polymer prototyping, and traditional machining (both manual and CNC). He has also worked on mechanical part design and mechatronic systems during his career.

Education (more>>)
2010 PhD Mech. Eng. Stanford University
2006 MS Mech. Eng. Stanford University
2004 BS Mech. Eng. MIT
2004 BS Creative Writing (Lit. minor) MIT
2000 Illinois Math and Science Academy
Visitorships:
2006 Tsinghua University, China
2003 Oxford University, England

Professional Experience (more>>)
Dr. Parness is the principal investigator on several research projects at JPL, supported the proposed MoonRise mission, and serves as a team member for the JPL Chief Technologists Office focussing on the Space Technology Program.

Research Interests (more>>)
Dr. Parnesss current research interests include anchoring systems for Near Earth Objects, where there is virtually no gravity, climbing robots for natural terrain including cliff faces and cave ceilings, micro ground vehicles (<100 grams) with dynamic mobility, and new methods of robotic manipulation that do not rely on traditional friction-based force-closure.

Selected Publications (more>>)

A Parness, "Anchoring Foot Mechanisms for Sampling and Mobility in Microgravity," IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Shanghai, China, 2011., May, 2011.

A Parness, "Microstructured adhesives for climbing applications," Stanford University PhD Thesis, 2010.

A Parness, A Asbeck, S Dastoor, L Fullerton, N Esparza, D Soto, B Heyneman, M Cutkosky, "Climbing rough vertical surfaces with hierarchical directional adhesives," IEEE ICRA, 2009, 2675-2680.

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